Early November Garden

November 2nd was a particularly beautiful day so I shot a few pictures of the garden and some of the things left in it. I didn’t bother with the carrots, parsnips, fennel, leeks and such but maybe in some of the shots you can see them. Here is an overview of the raised bed portion of the garden.

If you follow the fence to the far left, as it goes to its left, you would find the part of the garden that has the kale and collards.  The fence to the rear has fruit trees that are espaliered. The structure in the upper left is my chicken coop/run that is not now occupied.

Here are some details from the garden.

Radicchio Traviso

Radicchio Treviso

The treviso radicchio will be pulled soon and put to work. Like Belgian Endive one pulls the radicchio out by the roots, cuts the tops off to an inch of the top of the root, puts the root in a bucket with other roots, puts water in the bucket, puts the bucket in a moderate cellar of 50 degrees (fahr.) and covers the whole thing with a light-blocking cover. What grows is the traditional conical red/white head that is radichio treviso. Beow is a pict from a catalog. The time from harvest from the garden to produce is about 8 weeks. BTW … one can get a good product from a big root of the cousin of Radicchio, the dandelion.

Stock footage

Stock footage

There are a number of nice lettuces and other salad greens growing in the garden. Thanks to breeding for cold tolerance, a bit of global warming and floating row cover, they are doing right well these days.

escarole

escarole

Classic Batavian Escarole is ready to be harvested. I could try to blanch the centers a bit. We have eaten it already and it is really good as a cooked green. If I wanted to eat it raw, blanching would really improve the flavor (less bitter) and the texture (more tender).

Spinach and L. Rosso

Spinach and L. Rosso

The spinach was planted to winter over but it has developed so well that I will probably just keep it protected and eat it this month. The Rosso Lettuce is doing very well indeed. Scattered in the bed are a few plants of coriander.

mixed greens

mixed greens

Often when I am starting plants for placement into the beds in mid season I have a few that don’t fit where I plan them. If I am lucky, there is a bed that can handle the overflow. This is that bed. You can see some frisee endive, escarole, a couple of Cimmeron Cos and some nice Speckles lettuce in the foreground.

Winterbore Kale

Winterbore Kale

Here is a section of the fence line that has my Kale … Winterbor is a fantastic kale variety. It is very tasty and will hold up to temps into the teens. You can notice on the left one of my two Tuscan Kale plants (tall and skinny leaves). They taste great in soup but they are not very hearty … maybe 28F or so.

Collards

Collards

The debate in our family is Kale vs Collards. My wife and son Peter prefer Kale while my son Alex and I prefer collards. I do think that Kale has the better texture while collards have a better flavor.

Chard Bright lights

Chard Bright lights

The remains of the family Chard plant. There were two of them but one got a root borer and passed. Two well cared-for chard plants will keep a normal family with a diverse garden in chard for the year. It is, however, one of the most beautiful plants in the garden, esp. Bright Lights.

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